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John Abbot is co-owner of ChinaLoveMatch.net. Married to a lovely Chinese Lady and living in China, John knows and respects China, Chinese Women, Chinese People and Chinese Culture. His blog will include good stuff about Online Dating, Chinese Women, International Relationships and Things Chinese. Join John Abbot on Google+
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Online Dating Security Photos: What Value Are They On a Scam Datng Site?

By John Abbot
335 Views | 5 Comments | 9/26/2017 2:16:12 AM

Some Security Photos are Better than Others.

We recently received a message from a fairly new member thanking us for introducing Security Photos to him. Of course, Security Photos have an important role to play on legitimate dating sites, but they should not be relied on too much. In some situations they provide a great deal of security, but in others they provide none.



First I'll show you the letters that passed between the member and CLM, and then I'll comment on security photos generally as wo when they can be relied on and when they can't. Finally, you can see if you can pass a little test I'll present to you.



Member Letter



I want to thank you for having the security photos. I am/was on Chnlove. I spent $1,000, in about six weeks, writing and talking to a woman(?) before I found your site. I wrote to her asking to send me a picture with her holding an identifying sign. The indignant reply claiming that I insulted her and how could I do this knowing how much we love each other. I learned two things 1) it was a scam or 2) I don't want to be with a woman that would react like this. Truly amazing. Live and learn. P.S. Chnlove is now Asiame.com, they rolled all of their Asian sites into one, China, Taiwan. Viet Nam etc. Thank you again for giving me a way to check for scammers.



CLM Response (written by me)



We appreciate your communications and are glad that your demand for a security photo led you to realize this lady either wasn't real or wasn't worthy of being a life partner.



But we have to warn you that, while security photos are excellent for protecting you from private scammers who roam all dating sites, they are not always effective when the website itself is perpetrating the scams.



In cases like Chnlove, the women are sometimes innocent victims of the Chinese marriage agencies that deal with Chnlove, and are totally unaware they are on an online dating site. Those women obviously can't easily provide a security photo because the agent can't explain why he needs it.



Other women are members of Chnlove who long ago tried to get removed from the site when they discovered what a scam it is. Chnlove keeps operating their accounts even though they have asked to be removed. Obviously these women also can't comply with a request for a security photo.



However, many of the women on Chnlove are paid employees of the agencies who contract with Chnlove, and they could easily provide a security photo of requested, which might actually give the scam victim a greater false sense of security.



But it is a great way to determine if a person on many dating sites is real or not. 



However, the best way by far is a clear and unquestionable video chat where you can clearly see the person's lips move, hands move and the words spoken clearly match the movements. Questions are answered spontaneously. The person on camera is the person in his/her profile photos.



We hope you have better luck here on CLM and ALM and find a great match. Many people have.



Thanks again for your message.



Additional Thoughts



1. Security Photos are only of value if you are confident that the dating site you are on is 100% honest and reliable. Generally it is in the website's interest, financially, to give scammers a somewhat free rein. Scammers tend to get real members excited about upgrading because they always post great photos of either beautiful women or handsome men, and then contact hundreds of members hoping to get a few on the hook and reel them in. Of course, those members will upgrade to get a chance to chat with such attractive bait.



That's why over 90% of sites pretend scammers don't exist and happily let them suck real members into coughing up some fees. We used to tell our members which other sites they could trust, but we've stopped doing that because we've come to believe that almost all sites are planting fake members and sending fake messages from those fake members to lure real members to cough up their upgrade fees. Of course, these same sites are not really interested in going to the substantial work involved in eliminating scammers, because it is costly employee time to do so, and it results in fewer upgrade fees being collected.



Besides us, CLM and ALM, we do not know of any other sites we can say, with confidence, that they are not running fake members and are not letting scammers enjoy freedom to do as they choose. So these same sites are either not going to promote the use of Security Photos, or they are going to approve security photos without caring of they are valid or not.



If that sounds ugly, it's because it is ugly.



2. Now double down and assume the dating site is not merely planting fake members and letting scammers roam free, they are actually conducting all the scams themselves. ChnLove.com is one such site. Others include AsianDate.com. AForeignAffair.com, Gagamatch.com, and so many others I've lost track of them all. The majority of the online dating industry are scam operations, from top to bottom, in everything they do.



On those sites, generally, a security photo is meaningless. When the member who wrote to us said that the reaction he received on ChnLove was that she was insulted he asked for a security photo, I was sure instantly, that in that case the woman was a real person who had signed up with one of ChnLove's agents, and was completely unaware that she even had a profile on ChnLove. That's why they had to react as if she was insulted. Because the agent could not ask her to pose for a security photo, or she would have been very suspicious as to why he needed it. She thinks she's with a legitimate marriage agency who are actively seeking men to come to meet her, not charging hundreds of men countless dollars for messages they write without her knowledge.



If this man who wrote us was dealing with an employee oc Chnlove, then, of course, they would have simply provided a security photo of her and he would have naively relaxed and continured pouring money into their web of deceipt.



All of which tells you that you can only trust a security photo posted by a dating site member if you can trust the dating site. Since you can't trust over 90% of dating sites, you have to be very careful about trusting security photos.



A Test For You



Give this a shot. Have a look at the photo above and tell me at least 2 reasons why that photo is not acceptable as a security photo. There are at least 4 reasons so you should be able to come up with two of them.



PLease post your answers in the comments below.


Copyright owned jointly by Author and CyberCupid Co., Ltd. Breach of copyright will be prosecuted.
Comments
(Showing 1 to 5 of 5) 1
#2017-09-27 08:38:10 by YinTingYu @YinTingYu

@John Abbot

Hi John !!   Here's what I see that gives suspicion for this "Security Photo".

1.The website address is incomplete. I think it should read "ChinaLoveMatch.net" not just "ChinaLoveMatch".

2. No "User Name".

3. No "Date".

4. Both hands are not on the sign. Could be
"Photo-Shopped".

5. I sense it would be best if all were "Hand" written and,... use a "Selfie" snapshot.

Hopes this helps. Peace and Blessings,

Gongji (Y.T.Y.)

 

#2017-09-27 21:37:49 by Barry1 @Barry1

"tell me at least 2 reasons why that photo is not acceptable as a security photo"

 

1. The sign she's holding looks too neat and professional.

 

2. There's no date anywhere. Could be years old. Or fake.

 

3. There's no background, except for white. This tends to make one believe it's a photoshopped image or at the very least, a professionally created one that therefore is suspicious.

 

4. Some would argue also that her alluring pose and clothing also raises suspicions as to whether this is a genuine girl on a genuine, non-scam site. The overall feeling is this type of alluring picture would be more suited to a typical dating scam site.

#2017-09-28 08:27:40 by paulfox1 @paulfox1

With the exception of George Soros, it would be difficult to find lower low-life scum than Chnlove. I wrote a blog on CLM a few years ago called something like 'How To Scam a Scammer' which detailed how I got my own back (TWICE) and gave them a taste of their own medicine. I still laugh to this day when I think about it.

That said, there's more to photos than just the security aspect of them. I know it's 'old hat', but in the instances I mentioned above, I was introduced to two ladies who bore no resemblance to the pics of the ladies I assumed I had been chatting with.

Once again, it needs to be mentioned that ladies who put profile pics on sites such as this should make sure they are honest and up-to-date. Sure, you might have a pic that was taken on the beach in 2009, but that's NOT what we want to see in 2017. I guess it also applies to the male members.

One day, you are likely to meet the person you have been chatting with here - whether on video chat or in the flesh - and no-one likes embarrassing 'surprises'

#2017-09-28 11:45:17 by Barry1 @Barry1

@JohnAbbot

 

Reason number five I'd suspect this image is fake is that a reverse image search indicates her image is found plentifully on other sites such as gettyimages.com or bigstockphoto.com, so yet again, this is a big red flag as to her authenticity.

#2017-09-30 13:38:44 by JohnAbbot @JohnAbbot

@YinTingYu 



1.The website address is incomplete. I think it should read "ChinaLoveMatch.net" not just "ChinaLoveMatch". The point of the sign saying ChinaLoveMatch is more that it is very hard for a scammer to steal someone's photos off the internet and have one that specifically holds up a sign saying our website's name. So that would not really change whether they added the .net at the end or not. Photos stolen from anyone's Facebook page, or Instagram page or blog or any other place where they have posted them for their own personal reasons are not going to say either ChinaLoveMatch or ChinaLoveMatch.net. 



2. No "User Name".  Because the security photos are posted on the member's profile, and their other photos are also posted there to be compared to, it is not necessary for either the username or the date to be added. Either the security photo is of the same person as the profile photos ot it is not.



3. No "Date". See answer to 2 above.



4. Both hands are not on the sign. Could be "Photo-Shopped". You're damned close on this one. While both hands are not necessary, it is essential that a clear path be visible that shows the fingers to the hand to the wrist to the arm to the shoulder to the face, so that the viewer can see that there is no question that the person in the photo is actually holding the sign. In this case we cannot see the connection from the fingers to the hand nor the hand to the wrist nor the wrist to the arm, so a scammer could have easily taken the sign plus fingers from a different photo and photoshopped it into this photo.  



5. I sense it would be best if all were "Hand" written and,... use a "Selfie" snapshot. I can't see whether the sign is handwritten or not, nor whether it is a selfie or not, making any difference as to whether it really is a picture of the woman in the profile photos holding up a sign reading ChinaLoveMatch, thereby proving that her profile photos are not stolen from someone else's online photos.



@Barry1



1. The sign she's holding looks too neat and professional. If she is the same person as the person in her profile photos then it's hard to see how it would make any difference that it is neat and professional.



2. There's no date anywhere. Could be years old. Or fake. Again, it is about whether it is the same person in the profile photos and can we see that the sign has not been photoshopped into a photo of that same person.  



3. There's no background, except for white. This tends to make one believe it's a photoshopped image or at the very least, a professionally created one that therefore is suspicious. Yes, if the photos on the profile are all equally studio quality photos, then this one could have been stolen (or purchased) irom the same group of studio quality photos and the scammer could have then simply typed in ChinaLoveMatch into the held up sign.



4. Some would argue also that her alluring pose and clothing also raises suspicions as to whether this is a genuine girl on a genuine, non-scam site. The overall feeling is this type of alluring picture would be more suited to a typical dating scam site. As you know we have numerous ladies who post alluring and quite beautiful photos of themselves, so why couldn't they also post an alluring security photo?



5. Reason number five I'd suspect this image is fake is that a reverse image search indicates her image is found plentifully on other sites such as gettyimages.com or bigstockphoto.com, so yet again, this is a big red flag as to her authenticity. You're bang on with this one, and since this photos is a model whose images, including this photo, are available for sites like ours to purchase and use as "models" in photoshoots for our site, you can bet a lot of money that the person in the photo is not a real member of CLM. In fact, if you go to our "Chinese Women" landing page you will find her there. 


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