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Barry from Australia is a questioning soul who looks at social issues from an alternative point of view and instead of asking, “Why?”, he asks “Why not?” He’s convinced that many of his previous incarnations were spent in China. He feels drawn to the people there; attracted by their rich culture and way of life. If given one wish from God, he’d reply, “I want everyone on Earth to be the same colour, speak the same language, and treat each other as they themselves would like to be treated.”
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My China Trip - Day 21, Part 7 我的中国之行-第21天,第7部分    

By Barry Pittman
4988 Views | 24 Comments | 1/7/2015 10:16:28 AM
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(Showing 11 to 20 of 24) Previous 1 2 3 More...
#2015-02-01 21:18:48 by Barry1 @Barry1

@anonymous12861

"your writings are leaning more towards "what is the meaning of life?"........ You articulate to the audience quite well how you are feeling mentally and physically."

Thanks for your comments, Anon12861.

It would take a very closed minded person indeed to not be deeply affected by what one sees when the poorer areas of China are visited. I realise now what a relatively easy, protected life I've had up to this point.

Your observation that it is Tina who is helping bring out some of my hitherto repressed thoughts and feelings about things may well be correct. Her best friend is a female monk; apart from that, she has very few other friends that she chats to regularly. This illustrates her introspective, reflective personality which mirrors my own in many ways.

I will pay more attention to describing my personal interactions with Tina in upcoming episodes. Yet I do not wish to bore people. This is the eternal conundrum faced by any writer - how to tell a story or a set of facts in a way that interests people, rather than sending them to sleep.

As for the pouty behaviour some Chinese ladies often exhibit, let me say that I know what you mean. I think the term for it is called sajiao. I've experienced it myself, but not with Tina. I dare to say it has something to do with their upbringing, for example, if they were brought up as a "little princess", spoilt child. I can't see a lady who has lead a tough early life resorting to these somewhat infantile antics.

My best advice to discourage such behaviour is to do what you already do, that is, simply ignore it. It can seem a little cute or endearing at first, but soon the novelty of it wears thin.

John Abbot in fact penned an excellent article about sajiao here:

http://blog.chinalovematch.net/blog/article/Sajiao-Is-It-Unbecoming-of-Chinese-Women

Cheers mate. (y)(beer)




#2015-02-03 20:49:22 by melcyan @melcyan

“I will pay more attention to describing my personal interactions with Tina in upcoming episodes. Yet I do not wish to bore people. This is the eternal conundrum faced by any writer - how to tell a story or a set of facts in a way that interests people, rather than sending them to sleep.”

You write very well Barry but I think your personal interactions with Tina have the potential to be the most interesting part of your writing. This was the most interesting part of Imi's writing. Readers always appreciate a writer's vulnerability and heart to heart honesty. It is never boring.

#2015-02-03 21:15:32 by melcyan @melcyan

@Barry1
@anonymous12861
“As for the pouty behaviour some Chinese ladies often exhibit, let me say that I know what you mean. I think the term for it is called sajiao.” “My best advice to discourage such behaviour is to do what you already do, that is, simply ignore it.”

I find Sajiao very entertaining. I enjoy mimicking Sajiao. My partner used to use it a little but now no longer chooses to use it.
This may have something to do with the way I mimic her niece's use of Sajiao. My partner's family cannot stop laughing when I do it. Even my niece finds it funny.

#2015-02-04 20:43:31 by Barry1 @Barry1

@melcyan

"You write very well Barry"

Thanks for your encouragement, Melcyan. I do like to spin a yarn from time to time and hope like hell that it doesn't bore anyone!

You also said,

"I think your personal interactions with Tina have the potential to be the most interesting part of your writing. This was the most interesting part of Imi's writing."

Being a somewhat circumspect man, I must hesitatingly admit that I don't like to get too personal in my writing. Unlike @Imi5922 who tended to wear his heart on his sleeve. Yet I hear what you're saying. Your words won't be ignored.

Whatever happened to Imi, by the way? Where are you, mate?

It was interesting to hear that you sometimes in good humour deliberately perform a bit of sajiao. This would be a real hoot. Well done, Melcyan! (clap)

#2015-02-05 20:04:35 by QinQL @QinQL

@Barry1

I like to see the pics of frogs, awesome, cute. They seem to be taken by a professional photographer. So I like more to see all of photos to be taken by you or Tina and each of the explanation for each of the photos. Thank you for sharing us

Wow, so nice to hear you lustily shout out ----- “God bless China! God bless the Chinese!” As I am one of Chinese people. I’d like to add too ---- God bless you and Tina. God bless all of us on CLM. God bless all in the world.

#2015-02-06 23:42:14 by Barry1 @Barry1

@QinQL

"I like to see the pics of frogs, awesome, cute"

Thanks for your comments, QinQL.

Yes, frogs are adorable creatures. I couldn't resist sneaking a picture of a few of them into my blog article. I was hoping John Abbot might not notice them. (giggle)

I hope your search for a partner is going well. Being the attractive and intelligent lady that quite obviously you are, I'm sure many men would earnestly want you.

Thank you for your blessings and bye for now. (f)

#2015-02-07 10:20:35 by Biancadou @Biancadou

Wow, I am impressived by your pics and what you write, I think exactly the same thing with you, 如果外国人来中国 - 或者任何海外国家- 他们应该放弃大众观光景点,而选择偏僻传统的区域。只有这样他们才能看到这个国家的本真,真正的传统,真实的人。Actually, this is not only to foreigners, but also to Chinese people themselves, can you imagine that not every one in China really know how China is really like except where do they live? The first time I went to Hunan, and went to the small but beautiful villages, I already thoght I didn't know how many colorful culture we had in this country. I also recommend you go to Guizhou and Xinjiang, I saw one of my friends' photoes there, they are extremly amazing!

#2015-02-08 08:39:58 by Barry1 @Barry1

@Biancadou

"I am impressed by your pics and what you write"

Thank you for your kind words, Biancadou. I'm impressed with your words and thoughts also. I'm always inspired by multilingual speakers.

I agree that China is such a huge and diverse country, it's almost impossible to see and experience it all, except superficially. Hopefully aspects of what I write will encourage others to visit some of the places I've been to, such as Jiuzhaigou or Mt Emei.

I'll certainly add Guizhou, Hunan and Xinjiang also to the list of places I need to visit.

Once again, thank you for your kind words, Biancadou and my very best wishes to you. (f)

#2015-02-18 10:02:12 by Map1 @Map1

As a professional educator for almost 25 years, I have spent 10 of them as a part of the educational reforms in China by teaching through Teacher Development and teaching English majors preparing to be teachers in rural and city Middle Schools. 20 years ago they weren't allowed to use the Communicative Approach, but now that's changing as the new generation enters the profession. In the province where I worked for 5 years I observed some Junior High courses where they used an American series published in China. English is difficult, because it utilizes the analytical side of one's brain as Mandarin uses the creative. So they must switch. Most of what they learn in school is grammar and reading. Having taught English Grammar in the US, I think that it should be taught inductively via lots of reading of English articles, novels, non-fiction etc. A good friend of mine son is a voracious reader who is home schooled and he began writing short stories and novels at a young age. By the way I've met a great Christian woman here and she's a university English teacher with a BA and MA from one of the best universities in her province. She still makes grammar and speaking mistakes (Chinglish). A friend who's from Hong Kong and one of the top International Business professors in the world (Beijing University and USC faculty member) also makes grammatical speaking errors. It's a life long process of learning in either English and Mandarin.

#2015-02-18 14:13:42 by Barry1 @Barry1

@Map1

"I've met a great Christian woman here and she's a university English teacher with a BA and MA from one of the best universities in her province"

Congratulations Map1 - it's great to hear you've met a fine, upstanding person through this website.

Thanks also for giving us your thoughts on the English and Chinese language, particularly as they refer to teaching.

I'm currently studying for an Advanced Diploma in TESOL, so I hear and understand everything you've told us.

"English is difficult, because it utilizes the analytical side of one's brain as Mandarin uses the creative. So they must switch"

I hadn't realised this. Both languages are difficult to understand in their own way, I agree.

One of the hardest things also about English is its lack of conformity, for example, a toff is an aristocratic dandy, whilst a cough is an expulsion of air from our mouth. Both sound similar yet are spelt completely differently. Multiply this by ten thousand such irregularities and you'll see what I mean.

Best wishes to you, Map1. (y)

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